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Psyche Inspired: Jeremy Seidner

This is a portrait of Psyche Inspired member Jeremy Seidner

Jeremy Seidner (Photo Credit: Abigail Weibel)

Institution: Arizona State University

Major: Computer Science

Psyche Inspired Class: 2017-2018

This image shows the front, side, and back of a custom cereal box for

Atomic Asteroids

Jeremy Seidner

May 4, 2018

Major: computer science

Genre/Medium: illustration

About the work: This piece started out as a surrealistic concept, and was later adapted into a cereal box interpretation based on one of the sketches. The Psyche character designed for the children’s book, Psyche’s Journey to a Metal World, was used to cross project platforms. The design displays multiple marketing strategies that the food industry uses to attract shoppers, but also has educational information about the Psyche mission.

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Cover for the children's book

Psyche’s Journey to a Metal World

Caralie Cedarleaf (Text), Jeremy Seidner & Chris Vasquez (Illustrations), & John Domenico (Story Concept)

February 16, 2018

Majors: sculpture (Caralie); computer science (Jeremy); drawing (Chris); ceramics/materials science (John)

Genre/Medium: creative writing and digital illustration

About the work: This children’s coloring book tells the story of Psyche’s journey. Read the book online or download and print the full book to color the pages yourself:

Psyche’s Journey to a Metal World
(PDF: Regular – 3MB / Large – 39MB)

This painting shows a sculpture of a woman in a white gown holding a black orb with markings on it and standing in front of a larger orb in pinks and reds. The border of the image is in orange and black. In the background are lightly-painted images of doves.

Psyche the Goddess

Jeremy Seidner

January 16, 2018

Major: computer science

Genre/Medium: watercolor

About the work: For this piece, I used a blend of Greek and Art Deco themes to portray the goddess Psyche holding the metal asteroid named after her. The Psyche spacecraft is also hidden in the design. The color scheme is taken from the Psyche mission logo. The piece is symbolic, including the sun presiding over the galaxy and the butterfly, which Aristotle named Psyche (ψυχή), the Greek word for the soul. The eyes are the window to the soul for some, so the goddess’ face is blank except for her eyes, a mirror for anyone to gaze at and see themselves. The goddess’ lover, Eros (better known by his Roman name, Cupid) is represented by his wings near the sun. Zeus made Psyche immortal and is represented by his Roman name, Jupiter. Ionic columns were used in the temples to the gods of ancient Greece, who drank ambrosia, the nectar of the gods, brought to them by doves.

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This image shows a black paper background onto which has been painted an artist's rendition of the Psyche asteroid using thousands of tiny white dots.

Star Dust

Jeremy Seidner

December 13, 2017

Major: computer science

Genre/Medium: pointillism

About the work: This piece portrays the darkness of space and the loneliness of Psyche, even within the asteroid belt: a black sheet of poster board stippled with white ink. To serve as a model for the possible shapes and textures of the asteroid, I used a chunk of iron to mimic the nickel-iron core. A pointillism style felt appropriate to serve as a metaphor that the asteroid, like all of us, is made up of ‘star dust’.

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This four-panel watercolor shows the imagined launch of the Psyche spacecraft, with a large group of young children and adults watching the launch with excitement.

Launch Day

Jeremy Seidner

November 7, 2017

Major: computer science

Genre/Medium: watercolor pencils on cold-pressed watercolor paper

About the work: This piece aims to convey the excitement of the Psyche mission to the public, like the excitement we feel as children. While brainstorming layout ideas, I couldn’t decide on one, so I decided to incorporate all four of them into one large piece. This not only added more creativity, but also provided different perspectives of what it may look like on launch day. I chose to use a watercolor technique and cartoon-looking children for the piece because I felt the two styles relate with the child in all of us.

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